children Immunizations schedule guide
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children Immunizations schedule guide

 

One of the most important preparations that you must be prepared for when your child is born is vaccinations. Your infant needs some vaccinations to maintain his health. Vaccinating your child is very important more than you imagine, and ignoring some vaccinations or delaying will cause an impact on the child’s health, so you must commit to vaccinating him in the right time.

In our article, we present you children Immunizations schedule guide

children Immunizations schedule guide
children Immunizations schedule guide

importance children Immunizations

Immunizations help prevent your child from contracting serious diseases that may threaten his life, such as polio and various hepatitis. In fact, vaccinations have contributed to the spread and elimination of these diseases, as some of them are close to disappearing.

Vaccinations are one of the most important ways to eradicate epidemics in the world and prevent their spread. Vaccinations work indirectly to protect individuals who cannot take vaccinations from transmission of infection to them, as some children cannot take them because they have allergies to some medicines, or to a weak immune system, or some who do not They have these vaccinations available in their country, which helps prevent the spread of these epidemics.

 

Diseases prevented by vaccinations

poliomyelitis

Polio appears as a result of a virus that attacks the brain and spinal cord of an infected person, causing paralysis, and it is dangerous because it is an infectious disease that is transmitted from one person to another.

 

chicken pox

Chickenpox causes a rash in the form of blisters accompanied by severe itching in addition to fever, and it is an infectious disease that is transmitted from one person to another.

 

tetanus

Tetanus causes painful muscle tension in the muscles of the mouth and throat and may lead to death.

 

The flu

It is a well-known disease caused by a virus that infects the nose, throat, and lungs.

 

Whooping cough

Symptoms of whooping cough are difficulty breathing and a frequent, uncontrollable cough.

 

pneumococcal disease

It is a disease of the ear and sinuses, and when not treated quickly, this disease may cause pneumonia or meningitis.

 

rotavirus

It results from a viral infection that causes severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and pain in the abdominal area, and it is a very contagious disease.

 

children Immunizations schedule guide
children Immunizations schedule guide

 

mumps

Mumps affects the salivary glands, causing protrusion and swelling in the cheeks and jaw area.

 

Hepatitis

It results from a viral infection that causes inflammation of the liver and impairment of its ability to perform its functions.

 

Measles

It is a virus that causes fever and rash, and is very contagious among individuals.

 

rubella

It is a rare disease that causes fever and rashes in the form of red or pink skin patches. It is also very contagious.
Schedule of basic vaccinations for children

 

children Immunizations schedule guide
children Immunizations schedule guide

 

children Immunizations schedule 

Day 1

  • When the child is born, he must take the zero dose of the oral polio vaccine.
  • He is also vaccinated against tuberculosis by syringe through the skin in the upper left arm of the child.
  • He was vaccinated against hepatitis B virus by intramuscular injection into the right thigh.

 

After two months

  • The child must be vaccinated against polio again, and it is called the initial oral dose.
  • He must also receive the pentavalent vaccination against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, hepatitis B and influenza by intramuscular injection into the right thigh.

 

Four months later

  • The child must take another dose of polio, which is the second dose orally.
  • Injectable polio vaccination (SOLK).
  • Also repeat the injection of the pentagram intramuscularly in the right thigh.

 

After six months

  • The child must take the third dose of the polio vaccination.
  • Also, on the pentavalent vaccination syringe.

 

After nine months

  • The child must take the fourth dose of the polio vaccination.
  • 2 capsules of vitamin A are given

 

When the child is exactly one year old

  • The child must take the fifth dose of the polio vaccination.
  • The first dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination was administered via a subcutaneous injection in the right arm.

 

When the child is exactly one and a half years old (18 months)

  • The child must take the booster dose of the polio vaccination and the triple vaccination against diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus by intramuscular injection into the outer part of the middle of the left thigh.
  • Also, the second dose of vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella, by injection under the skin in the right arm.
  • 2 capsules of vitamin A are given

 

Some important additional vaccinations

At the age of two months

  • Take the first dose of any type of pneumococcal vaccination (2 or 3 doses)
  • the first dose of any type of rotavirus vaccination is taken (2 or 3 doses)

 

At 4 months old

  • Take the second dose of any type of pneumococcal vaccination (2 or 3 doses)
  • the second dose of any type of rotavirus vaccination (two or three doses) is taken.

 

At 6 months old

  • the third dose of the pneumococcal vaccination (3 doses) is taken.
  • the third dose of rotavirus vaccination (3 doses) is taken.

 

At the age of one year

  • The first dose of the chickenpox vaccination is taken
  • At the age of one and a half years
  • The second dose of the chickenpox vaccination is taken
  • The first dose of hepatitis A vaccination is taken at the age of one year
  • The second dose of hepatitis A vaccination is taken at the age of one and a half or two years.

 

At the age of two years

  • the meningitis vaccination is taken when the child is two years old, and a single dose gives immunity for 3 years.

 

Between the ages of 4-6

  • the second dose of the chickenpox vaccination is taken
  • the booster dose for pneumococcal vaccinations is taken at the age of 6 years.

 

And you should not worry when some temporary side effects appear, such as minor fever, joint pain, vomiting, or swelling under the skin at the injection site. to relieve symptoms.

In Egypt, the necessary vaccinations are provided for children from the age of one day to 18 months in government health centers and units. Child vaccination is free for all infants in most countries of the world, so do not forget to vaccinate your child on time!

To learn more about more useful articles for you and your child, you can visit our blog at the following link

https://markitee.com/blog

 

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